vr-header-guide-riders

Discover
our rider manual


TRAVELLING WITH VINTAGE RIDES Booking a motorcycle tour Preparing for a motorcycle tour I know where I'm going During the motorcycle tour Coming back Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
Who are Vintage Rides? Why travel with Vintage Rides? How can I contact Vintage Rides?
Do I need a motorcycle licence? Do I need to pay a deposit / motorcycle insurance? How far in advance should I book a motorcycle tour? What if I have to cancel my trip? Are there any age or fitness restrictions? Does Vintage Rides book international flights? What is included in the tour price? How do I book on a motorcycle tour?
What type of luggage should I take? Personal belongings and valuables What should I pack? Should I pack a first aid kit and basic medicines? Can I do my laundry on the tour? Do I need to take out travel insurance? Do I need to obtain an international driving permit? Can I extend my trip? What room types are there on the motorcycle tours? What accommodation types are available? Do I need to pack towels and bed linen? What is the electricity supply like on tour? Is there mobile phone and Wi-Fi coverage on tour?
Bhutan India Nepal Sri Lanka Thailand and Laos Indonesia Mongolia Peru Rwanda South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini Morocco France Sardinia
Once at the airport, who takes care of me? What languages does my Tour Leader speak? Who accompanies the motorcycle tours? Who takes care of me if something goes wrong? I want to take gifts, what should I pack? What type of food should I expect? Is the water drinkable? I have specific dietary requirements (allergies, vegetarian, gluten-free, etc.). Will I be able to easily eat on tour? Are there any Covid-19 measures in place?
Satisfaction questionnaire What if I have any questions after my trip? Where can I share my memories?
What riding level do I need to book on a Vintage Rides tour? What tour types does Vintage Rides offer? How can I prepare for an adventure tour? What motorcycles do we ride on Vintage Rides tours? Who looks after motorcycle maintenance? I have specific riding needs. Can Vintage Rides cater to them? Does Vintage Rides offer motorcycle rental? Can I use my own motorcycle? What equipment do I need for my trip? Do I need to pack a helmet? Can I buy motorcycle equipment when I get to the destination?
TRAVELLING WITH VINTAGE RIDES
Who are Vintage Rides?

Stemming from a passion for adventure travel and Royal Enfield motorcycles, Vintage Rides designs and runs classic motorcycle tours that combine the pleasure of riding a motorbike, discovering off-the-beaten-track destinations and seeking adventure.

TRAVELLING WITH VINTAGE RIDES
Why travel with Vintage Rides?

Vintage Rides is the pioneer of Royal Enfield motorcycle tours. We launched this concept in 2006 and our team of travel and biking enthusiasts strive to continually improve our motorcycle tours. Our team consists of tour leaders, mechanics, travel advisors and coordinators and we are all passionate about adventure, authentic experiences and tracks that lead us into the unknown. It is this passion combined with our constant thirst for new adventures that guarantee you an extraordinary experience when you book a Vintage Rides tour..

Vintage Rides is registered on the Atout France register (French Tourism Development Agency) with certificate No. IM075150006 issued on 01/09/2015.

In accordance with Article L.211-18 of the French Tourism Code, Vintage Rides has financial security from the French Tour Operator Association (APST by its acronym in French) and Professional Civil Liability insurance from HISCOX Europe Underwriting Limited, and fulfils the professional aptitude conditions required by this article to operate in France.

When you choose to travel with Vintage Rides, you are embarking on an adventure with a French agency regulated by the French Tourism Code that has sound financial and insurance guarantees.

TRAVELLING WITH VINTAGE RIDES
How can I contact Vintage Rides?

Our agency is based in Lyon, France. You can contact our team by telephone on +44 (0)20 7031 6050 from Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. or by appointment in Lyon.

Booking a motorcycle tour
Do I need a motorcycle licence?

There is only one rule if you want to go on a Vintage Rides motorcycle tour as a pilot: you need to hold an A or A2 licence. We will advise you on the best tour type in line with your riding level.

Most of our tours are suitable for pillions. However, we do not recommend and sometimes even do not allow pillions on some tours due to their difficulty. Contact your motorcycle travel advisor to discuss the type of trip you have in mind.

Booking a motorcycle tour
Do I need to pay a deposit / motorcycle insurance?

A deposit is required from pilots. The deposit amount is stated in the Full Itinerary and depends on the tour destination.

The deposit is secured via our partner Swikly, but not debited from your account. A Vintage Rides representative will carry out an inventory of your motorcycle with you before and after your motorcycle tour. The deposit may be retained if the motorcycle is damaged in any way or to cover the insurance excess in the event of an accident. Your travel documents will include a list of prices for repairs and spare parts for each destination.

Booking a motorcycle tour
How far in advance should I book a motorcycle tour?

We recommend booking your tour at least six months in advance so that you can guarantee your preferred dates. This also gives you plenty of time to obtain visas and the international driving permit (IDP) for the countries where they are required. We recommend applying for your international driving permit as soon as you start planning your motorcycle tour to avoid any delays. In the UK, you can obtain your IDP at the Post Office. For riders from other countries, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations. 

You can consult the I know where I’m going section to find out more about the country you are travelling to. Feel free to talk to your travel advisor who will advise you on each destination.

Booking a motorcycle tour
What if I have to cancel my trip?

Had an unexpected turn of events? Broken your collarbone, been invited to a last-minute family party or had your motorcycle licence suspended? Do you need to cancel your Vintage Rides motorcycle tour?

You can find out about our cancellation policy in our Terms and Conditions. Also, please do not hesitate to contact us and we will do our best to find a solution together.

Booking a motorcycle tour
Are there any age or fitness restrictions?

There is no age limit for a Vintage Rides motorcycle tour. We accept all bikers – from total novices to veterans – depending on the tour, as long as you are in good physical shape and able to keep up with the pace.

However, one point to keep in mind: no motorcycle tour is a walk in the park, even the less challenging ones. Many of our off-the-beaten-track motorcycle tours take place in countries where the health system is not on par with that of your home country. We therefore recommend being extra careful: you need to be fully transparent about the state of your health and tell us about your medical history or treatments. If you are not sure if you should join a tour due to your age or physical condition, do not hesitate to contact your travel advisor to talk about it and consult your doctor. Our recommendations can in no way replace sound medical advice.

Booking a motorcycle tour
Does Vintage Rides book international flights?

We currently do not offer international flight booking services. Some applications like Skyscanner can help you find the right flight. If you have any queries about dates or times, our team is here to help you find the best flight for your tour.

Booking a motorcycle tour
What is included in the tour price?

Your Full Itinerary outlines what is and is not included in the tour price.

Remember three important things: international flights, visas and travel insurance (with repatriation, medical and legal assistance cover) are always your responsibility.

Booking a motorcycle tour
How do I book on a motorcycle tour?

You can contact Vintage Rides either by leaving your contact details via the contact form and a tour advisor will get back to you or you can call +44 (0)20 7031 6050 or email at hello@vintagerides.com.

Booking procedure:
1. Read and e-Sign the quote and Terms & Conditions (you’ll receive them via email).
2. Pay your deposit (50% of the tour price).
3. You will receive a payment link via email.


PLEASE NOTE: your motorcycle tour is only considered booked when we receive your signed quote and Terms & Conditions and you have paid the deposit.
Your tour must be paid in full 45 days before the departure date. You will automatically receive a reminder email.

How to prepare for your tour:
This is very important! When you book far enough in advance (at least three months before the departure date) you will receive four emails to help you prepare for your tour. It is really important that you follow the instructions included in them.

1st email: immediately after booking
2nd email: 90 days before departure
3rd email: 60 days before departure
4th email: 15 days before departure

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
What type of luggage should I take?

What does an adventurer’s bag look like? If you want to travel light, plan on packing two or three daytime outfits depending on the tour length. On some tours, especially those where you spend two nights at the same place, you will be able to get your laundry washed. Pack evening wear for dinners (a shirt or polo shirt, one pair of shorts or trousers). A pair of flip-flops is always practical and a warm top (jumper or jacket) because it can even get chilly in the middle of the desert. That way you’ll have plenty of room for motorcycle gear, waterproofs and gifts without going over 15 kg.

 

As for your luggage, depending on your tour type, you may have to carry it or the support vehicle will. Either way, you will pack it, unpack it, carry it about, etc., so it is a good idea to opt for something that is easy to carry, resistant and waterproof. There will be very few occasions where you get the chance to wheel a suitcase, except maybe at the airport, so a backpack or duffle bag are probably the best options. Try not to go over 15 kg, especially if your tour includes a domestic flight, as you could find yourself paying for excess baggage. If needed, you can always wash essentials at your accommodation and even get laundry done in some cases. Just think about the positives: the fewer items you pack, the more room you have for souvenirs and gifts.

 

On most tours, riders’ luggage is transported by a support vehicle (check your Full Itinerary for your case), so we recommend packing a small backpack to keep all your daytime essentials with you on the motorcycle, i.e. camera, sun cream, waterproofs, water bottle or anything else you may need to keep at hand.

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
Personal belongings and valuables

You are responsible for your own personal belongings and we always prefer to encourage you to take extra caution. During your trip, you will change accommodation almost every day, eat somewhere new for every meal, meet new people, visit many different places, so there are many occasions where you could lose or forget your personal belongings! Avoid carrying high-value items (jewellery, video or photo equipment, tablets or large sums of cash) at all costs and never leave them unattended, not even in the support vehicle!

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
What should I pack?

The Full Itinerary includes a list of motorcycle and personal equipment, as well as recommended clothing depending on your destination’s climate and riding conditions.

There are some basics that would come in handy on any tour, not to mention good-quality motorcycle gear: waterproof walking boots/shoes, comfortable clothing with breathable materials, a good pair of sunglasses and a small backpack to carry your daytime essentials. Try not to go over 15 kg, especially if your tour includes a domestic flight: you could find yourself paying for excess baggage. You will always be able to wash essentials at the hotel, and even get laundry done at some accommodation providers.

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
Should I pack a first aid kit and basic medicines?

It is always a good idea to pack a few basic medicines and first aid items. Sun cream, a moisturising chapstick, paracetamol, anti-diarrhoeal medicines, disinfectant, dressings and plasters are essential in case of any minor injuries or mishaps.

This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the health systems in the destination country/ies do not always equal those in your home country. We therefore advise you to visit your GP before departure and he/she can help you customise your travel first aid kit.

Don’t forget to pack your prescriptions!

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
Can I do my laundry on the tour?

You may be able to wash your laundry when you spend two nights at the same place or if you arrive early at the end of your day’s riding. You should check with the accommodation providers and your Tour Leader once you are there.

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
Do I need to take out travel insurance?

Yes, you should never travel without insurance! You need to take out travel insurance that covers medical costs abroad, repatriation assistance, accidents involving two-wheeled vehicles (large displacement) and legal assistance.

Many insurance companies offer complete, effective packages (€60-€80 per person) and some credit cards also have special offers (i.e. if you purchase your flight with the same card). You must make sure that the insurance covers motorised travel in the destination countries and the special riding conditions.

For European motorcycle tours, until 31 December 2020, all British citizens can receive medical assistance with the EHIC card.

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
Do I need to obtain an international driving permit?

You may need an international driving permit (IDP) to drive in some non-EU countries. You can get an IDP at the Post Office. Please check if you need an IDP on the British government’s travel advice page. If you are from another country, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

If you already have an IDP, check that it is still valid before you travel. IDPs are valid for one to three years, depending on the type of IDP required and your destination country. For more information per country, check the I know where I am going section.

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
Can I extend my trip?

If you have booked to spend longer at the destination, you can extend your trip. You can spend an extra night at the start or end of the trip or choose from our extension catalogue for each destination! We know all of the countries inside out and are always here to share our tips with you.

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
What room types are there on the motorcycle tours?

You can choose your room type: double room (one double bed), twin (two single beds) or single room (i.e. you are alone in the room, in a single or double bed). We always do our best to accommodate your requests. If you are travelling alone, you will by default share a twin room with another rider. However, you can request a single room from your travel advisor in advance at an additional cost and subject to availability.

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
What accommodation types are available?

Depending on the destination and the tour you’ve chosen, you will stay at authentic guesthouses, comfortable hotels, with host families, in yurts or even at palaces like something out of Arabian Nights. We explore the destinations to discover and offer you the most original accommodation. In more remote areas, accommodation is sometimes rustic or even really basic: that’s sometimes part and parcel of having an extraordinary experience!

Your Full Itinerary describes the accommodation types and provides a general overview with photos. The accommodation mentioned in the Full Itinerary is an indication only and subject to availability.

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
Do I need to pack towels and bed linen?

You do not need to pack your own towels because hotels generally provide them, especially on our Motorcycle Rambles and Luxury Tours of course. However, it is always useful to pack a small, lightweight, compact microfibre towel, especially on Adventure Tours!

Some Full Itineraries recommend packing a sleeping bag and/or sleeping bag liners. On some tours, the accommodation conditions are somewhat rudimentary and the temperatures can drop quickly: it is therefore safer to pack extra. If it is not mentioned in the Full Itinerary, you do not need to pack it, unless you prefer to travel that way!

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
What is the electricity supply like on tour?

You can consult the I know where I’m going section to learn more about the types of travel adapters you’d need to charge your devices and the stability of the electricity supply at the destinations.

Preparing for a motorcycle tour
Is there mobile phone and Wi-Fi coverage on tour?

More and more hotels offer free Wi-Fi connection and traditional mobile operators work in most regions. But those who love being connected must be aware that the Wi-Fi signal can be very hit-and-miss and in some remote areas there may not even be an Internet connection. Some of our Mongolian and Himalayan tours could be the perfect occasion to take a digital detox! Take a look at the I know where I’m going section to learn more.

I know where I'm going
Bhutan

Obtaining a visa for India and Bhutan

Our local partner takes care of obtaining your visa for Bhutan. You don’t have to do anything.

However, your trip begins in India, so you must obtain a visa for India. You can apply for the Indian e-visa online via the Indian Visa website, meaning that you do not have to travel anywhere or provide your original documents.

It could take longer to obtain your visa during peak season: we therefore recommend that you apply for the “1 year” e-visa once you have booked your flights and of course, if the departure is in less than 365 days.

Please note, the application process is quite complex and we will not be able to intervene with the Indian authorities if you choose the incorrect e-visa. If you do not feel comfortable using computers, you may be better off seeking visa application services. You must use your name exactly as it appears on your passport (e.g. “Joe E. Bloggs”) for your Indian e-visa application and the e-visa may be requested at boarding and upon arrival.

Which driving permit do I need for Bhutan?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Bhutan. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Only the international driving permit is recognised in Bhutan and must be presented with your UK or European driving licence, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Bhutan

While travelling in Bhutan, you are subject to Bhutanese laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. are subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

In hotel rooms, sockets are designed to accept European and American plugs, you should therefore pack an adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The mobile phone network is generally good, except in some remote areas.

Wi-Fi addicts be warned: Wi-Fi is available in most hotels, but not everywhere, especially on the most remote legs of the tour.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Bhutan for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check your government’s travel recommendations for Bhutan.

Health tips for Bhutan

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of recommended first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Bhutan is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Bhutan?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-400 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

ATMs are more and more common; you can withdraw cash in the main cities in Bhutan (Paro, Thimphu). Your bank card may even be accepted in some places. However, we do recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at the bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Bhutan, tipping is a common practice and an integral part of Bhutanese culture. A tip is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. Here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. You should tip hotel porters 20-50 Indian rupees or Bhutanese ngultrum depending on the amount of luggage they carry for you. You should leave about 10% of the bill in restaurants that do not include service charge.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Bhutan?

It is generally cold in Bhutan (average 7°C-10°C during the day) with little chance of showers. It can get very cold in the evening, so remember to pack warm clothes. Always pack a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
India

Obtaining a visa for India

You can obtain the Indian e-visa online via the Indian Visa website, meaning that you do not have to travel anywhere or provide your original documents.

It could take longer to obtain your visa during peak season: we therefore recommend that you apply for the “1 year” e-visa once you have booked your flights and if the departure is in less than 365 days, of course.

Please note, the application process is quite complex and we will not be able to intervene with the Indian authorities if you choose the incorrect e-visa. If you do not feel comfortable using computers, you may be better off seeking visa application services. You must use your name exactly as it appears on your passport (e.g. “Joe E. Bloggs”) for your Indian e-visa application and the e-visa may be requested at boarding and upon arrival.

Which driving permit do I need for India?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in India. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Only the international driving permit is recognised in India and must be presented with your UK or European driving licence, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for India

While travelling in India, you are subject to Indian laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. are subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Plugs with two round pins are generally found in India, you should therefore pack an adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The telephone network in India is generally good except in the Himalayas, especially the Ladakh region. Apart from in the capital, Leh, calls don’t always go through and satellite phones are prohibited because it is a military area on the border with China.

Electricity and hot water are available in most areas, but not always guaranteed, especially in more remote regions. Generators are used to compensate for the bad electricity supply during blackouts, but they are often turned on sporadically and sometimes turned off at night.

Wi-Fi is available at most hotels in Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and southern India. Wi-Fi is not so readily available in Ladakh and the Himalayas, so if you really can’t live without, we recommend buying a SIM card when you arrive at the airport.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to India for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check your government’s travel recommendations for India.

Health tips for India

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of recommended first aid items and medicines. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in India is hit-and-miss and almost non-existent in more remote areas.

The UK government’s foreign travel advice website and the World Health Organization website provide recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

Acute altitude sickness can be the bane of our travels in the Himalayas, especially Ladakh. Our tours are designed for riders to acclimatise to the high-altitude environment and gradually climb, spending a limited time at high altitude (the time it takes to ride across the passes). Our team and your Tour Leader are experienced at spotting altitude sickness symptoms (headaches, nausea, loss of appetite, insomnia, etc.) and their consequences and will do everything possible to make sure you acclimatise. Some recommendations: drink lots of water, eat garlic, chew coca leaves, limit your alcohol intake and avoid straining yourself physically. If necessary, the support vehicle carries oxygen cylinders. Ask your doctor for advice on high altitude travel and get suitable medication prescribed if you need to.

Important: for Kinnaur and Ladakh tours, we need a medical certificate stating that you are in good health for riding at high altitudes.

How much spending money should I take to India? 

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your tour, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

Cash machines are more and more common; you can withdraw cash almost everywhere in India except in the Himalayas. It is therefore a good idea to withdraw money in Delhi, Dharamsala or Leh, as the later legs are very remote. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In India, tipping is a common practice and an integral part of Indian culture. A tip is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. You should tip hotel porters 20-50 rupees depending on the amount of luggage they carry for you. You should tip about 10% of the bill in restaurants that do not include service charge.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of group members and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in India?

The climate in India is varied. The country is so vast and its diverse landscapes mean temperature differences: expect an alpine climate in Ladakh, humidity in the Himalayan foothills, dry or humid tropics in southern India and a semi-arid to desert climate in Rajasthan!

You can generally expect little rain except in the Himalayan foothills, and rather pleasant or even hot temperatures, except in the Himalayas. We always recommend packing a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
Nepal

Obtaining a visa for Nepal

You can obtain an “On Arrival” visa upon arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport (Kathmandu). The procedure is quick and simple but there may be queues during peak season.

Which driving permit do I need for Nepal?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Nepal. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Only the international driving permit is recognised in Nepal and must be presented with your UK or European driving licence, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Nepal

While travelling in Nepal, you are subject to Nepalese laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. are subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Plugs with two round pins are generally found in Nepal, you should therefore pack an adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The telephone network coverage is generally good, except in Mustang.

Electricity and hot water are available in most areas, but not always guaranteed, especially in more remote regions of Mustang. Generators are used to compensate for the bad electricity supply during blackouts, but they are often turned on sporadically and sometimes turned off at night.

Wi-Fi is available at most hotels, except in Mustang. If you really can’t live without the Internet, we recommend buying a SIM card when you arrive at the airport. 

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Nepal for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check your government’s travel recommendations for Nepal.

Health tips for Nepal

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of recommended first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Nepal is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

Acute altitude sickness can be the bane of our travels in the Himalayas, especially Mustang. Our tours are designed for riders to acclimatise to the high-altitude environment and gradually climb, spending a limited time at high altitude (the time it takes to ride across the passes). Our team and your Tour Leader are experienced at spotting altitude sickness symptoms (headaches, nausea, loss of appetite, insomnia, etc.) and their consequences and will do everything possible to make sure you acclimatise. Some recommendations: drink lots of water, eat garlic, chew coca leaves, limit alcohol and avoid straining yourself physically. If necessary, the support vehicle carries oxygen cylinders. Ask your doctor for advice on high altitude travel and get suitable medication prescribed if you need to.

Important: for motorcycle tours in Nepal, we need a medical certificate stating that you are in good health for riding at high altitudes.

How much spending money should I take to Nepal? 

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-400 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

Cash machines are more and more common; you can withdraw money almost everywhere in Nepal, except in Mustang. It is therefore a good idea to withdraw money in Kathmandu or Pokhara, as the later legs are very remote. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Nepal, tipping is a common practice and an integral part of Nepalese culture. A tip is a gesture of thanks for a service rendered. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. You should tip hotel porters 40-100 Nepalese rupees depending on the amount of luggage they carry for you. You should tip about 10% of the bill in restaurants that do not include service charge.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Nepal?

During the seasons when we organise our trips to Nepal, the weather is generally good and the temperatures are pleasant in the daytime. It can be cold in the evening or even bitter in Mustang and Upper Mustang, where the weather is unpredictable. Warm clothes are a must! You can generally expect little rain, but pack a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case. 

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
Sri Lanka

Obtaining a visa for Sri Lanka

An Electronic Travel Authorisation (ETA) visa is required to travel to Sri Lanka. You can request it online via the Sri Lankan government’s website and you do not have to travel anywhere or provide your original documents.

Which driving permit do I need for Sri Lanka?

In Sri Lanka, you will need an International Driving Permit (IDP) and a Sri Lankan recognition permit to drive in Sri Lanka. 

Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located. We will then need your international driving permit as soon as possible to create your Sri Lankan recognition permit before departure. We take care of the procedures for obtaining the Sri Lankan permit.

Practical advice for Sri Lanka

While travelling to Sri Lanka you are subject to Sri Lankan laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

In hotel rooms, sockets are designed to accept European and American plugs, you should therefore pack an adapter or buy one when you arrive.

Wi-Fi addicts be warned: Wi-Fi is available in most hotels, but not everywhere, especially on the most remote legs of the tour.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Sri Lanka for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check your government’s travel recommendations for Sri Lanka.

Health tips for Sri Lanka

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of recommended first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Sri Lanka is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Sri Lanka?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

ATMs are very common; you can withdraw cash almost anywhere in Sri Lanka. However, we do recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Sri Lanka, tipping is a common practice and an integral part of Sri Lankan culture. A tip is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. You should tip hotel porters 50-100 Sri Lankan rupees depending on the amount of luggage they carry for you. You should leave about 10% of the bill in restaurants.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Sri Lanka?

It is generally hot in Sri Lanka during the seasons when we organise tours (average 30°C during the day) with some chance of showers. The climate can be cooler and the weather more uncertain in the Knuckles Mountain region. So remember to pack some warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
Thailand and Laos

Obtaining a visa for Thailand and Laos

You can set off for Thailand with peace of mind: British passport holders arriving by air or land can enter for 30 days without a visa! However, we do recommend you check your particular case.

Visa conditions change regularly in Laos. For the most up-to-date information, contact the nearest Laos Embassy or Consulate.

Please note: Laos offers an e-VISA. Unfortunately, we cross the border at Friendship Bridge number 4 (IV) where this e-VISA is not valid.

Which driving permit do I need for Thailand and Laos?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in both Thailand and Laos. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in these two countries and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Thailand and Laos

While travelling in Thailand and Laos, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Standard voltage in Thailand is 220 V and plugs have two flat parallel pins, you should therefore pack a travel adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The telephone network is generally good and Wi-Fi is available at most accommodation providers, but not everywhere, especially on the more remote legs.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Thailand and Laos for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Thailand and Laos

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Thailand or Laos is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Thailand and Laos?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

ATMs are very common; you can withdraw cash almost anywhere in Thailand and Laos. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Thailand and Laos, tipping is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Thailand and Laos?

It is generally warm in Thailand and Laos during the seasons when we travel there (average 30°C during the day) with little chance of rain. However, it can be cooler and more uncertain in mountainous regions, so remember to pack some warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
Indonesia

Obtaining a visa for Indonesia

You can set off for Indonesia with peace of mind: British citizen passport holders don’t need a visa for visits of up to 30 days! However, you should check the embassy website if your case is different.

Which driving permit do I need for Indonesia?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Indonesia. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in Indonesia and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Indonesia

While travelling in Indonesia you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Standard voltage is 220 ;, you should therefore pack a travel adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The mobile phone network is generally good and Wi-Fi is available at most hotels.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Indonesia for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Indonesia

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Indonesia is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Indonesia?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €400-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks). 

ATMs are very common; you can withdraw cash almost anywhere in Indonesia. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Indonesia, tipping is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Indonesia?

It is generally warm in Indonesia when we organise our tours (average 30°C during the day) with little chance of rain. It can be cooler and the weather more uncertain in mountainous regions. It is a good idea to pack warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
Mongolia

Obtaining a visa for Mongolia

A visa is required to travel to Mongolia. We will send you an invitation letter to attach to your visa application, approximately 3 weeks before departure.

You can also request it yourself from the Mongolia Immigration Agency or that of your country of origin.

Which driving permit do I need for Mongolia?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Mongolia. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in Mongolia and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Mongolia

While travelling in Mongolia, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

For your trip to Mongolia, you are recommended to pack an adapter: the sockets are three-pronged (alternating current 220 V, 50 Hz).

The mobile phone network covers the capital and the main cities. Beyond that, coverage is hit-and-miss. Wi-Fi is available in cities, but you can’t rely on it in remote areas.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Mongolia for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Mongolia

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Mongolia is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

Important: for Mongolia, we need a medical certificate stating that you are in good health for riding at high altitudes.

How much spending money should I take to Mongolia?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €300-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

ATMs are very common; you can withdraw cash in the main stopover towns. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in a city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Mongolia, tipping is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. Here are our recommendations for the team: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Mongolia?

You can expect an average between 15°C and 25°C during our tours with little chance of rain. It can cool down in the evening and in some areas. For the Frozen Ride tour, it can be very, very cold! Pack warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
Peru

Obtaining a visa for Peru

You can set off for Peru with peace of mind: you do not need a visa to stay for less than 3 months! However, do check the UK government’s travel advice website for up-to-date information or with your own government if you are not British.

Which driving permit do I need for Peru?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Peru. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in Peru and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Peru

When travelling to Peru, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

For your trip to Peru, we recommend packing an adapter just in case because some sockets only take plugs with two flat prongs (110/220 V, 50/60 Hz).

The mobile phone network is generally good and Wi-Fi is available at most hotels, but not everywhere, especially on the more remote legs.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Peru for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Peru

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Peru is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

Important: for Peru, we need a medical certificate stating that you are in good health for riding at high altitudes.

How much spending money should I take to Peru?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €400-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

You will find cash machines in Arequipa and at popular tourist sites at the very least. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. Service charges are included at most restaurants, otherwise diners usually leave 10% of the bill. You should tip hotel porters 3-5 soles depending on the amount of luggage they carry for you. 

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Peru?

You can expect an average between 15°C and 25°C when our motorcycle tours take place with little chance of rain. It can cool down in the evening and at altitude, so remember to pack warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
Rwanda

Obtaining a visa for Rwanda

A visa is required to enter Rwanda. According to the UK government’s travel advice, 30-day tourist visas are free and available on arrival for citizens of country members of the African Union, La Francophonie or the Commonwealth, including the UK. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Which driving permit do I need for Rwanda?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Rwanda. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in Rwanda and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Rwanda

While travelling in Rwanda, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Rwanda operates on a 230 V supply voltage and 50 Hz, i.e. the same as in Europe. You should therefore pack a European travel adapter or buy one on arrival.

The mobile phone network is generally good and Wi-Fi is available at most hotels, but not everywhere, especially on the more remote legs of the tour.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Rwanda for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Rwanda

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Rwanda is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Rwanda?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €400-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

You will find ATM machines on most legs of the tour and at popular tourist sites at the very least. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. Here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. Service charges are included at most restaurants, otherwise diners usually leave 10% of the bill. You should tip hotel porters, concierges and staff a few US dollars to show your gratitude. 

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Rwanda?

The temperatures are rather pleasant and vary little during the year. You can expect an average of 30°C during the day and 15°C at night. Remember to pack some warm clothes for cool evenings.

I know where I'm going
South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini

Obtaining a visa for South Africa

You can set off for South Africa with peace of mind: British passport holders do not require a visa to visit South Africa. For Lesotho and Eswatini, we take care of border crossing formalities. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Which driving permit do I need for South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport. We will need the copy of the first page of your licence to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini

When traveling to South Africa, Lesotho or Eswatini, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

A travel adapter would be required while travelling in South Africa, if you wish to use any UK electrical appliances (220-230 V). Universal adapters can be bought at supermarkets or at the airport.

The mobile phone network is excellent, as is the Wi-Fi, which is available at most hotels.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in some of the more remote areas is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site for South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €400-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

You will find ATMs almost everywhere. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the town/city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. Here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. Service charges are included at most restaurants, otherwise diners usually leave 10% of the bill. In hotels, you can leave a tip in the room for the housekeeper (around R10-15 per night) or give it to her directly. It is common to tip hotel porters 10 rand per bag. People have a habit of leaving a 10% tip for taxi drivers too.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini?

You can expect an average of between 10°C and 25°C when our motorcycle tours take place with little chance of rain. It can cool down in the evening and at altitude, so remember to pack warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
Morocco

Obtaining a visa for Morocco

You can set off for Morocco with peace of mind: according to the UK government’s travel advice website, British nationals don’t need a visa to enter Morocco for the purpose of tourism for up to three months. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Which driving permit do I need for Morocco?

Please check the UK government’s travel advice website for driving abroad and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Practical advice for Morocco

When traveling to Morocco, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Morocco operates on 220 V supply voltage with European standard plugs, you should therefore pack a travel adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The mobile phone network is generally good, as is the Wi-Fi, except in remote regions.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Morocco for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Morocco

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Morocco is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Morocco?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-300 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

You will find cash machines on most legs of the tour. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

Tipping is not compulsory in Morocco but is very common. When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. Here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. It is custom to tip a few dirhams to anyone who carries your bags or does you some sort of favour. A good tip in a restaurant is around 10- 15% of the bill. It is common to give 10% for taxis and 5-10 dirhams to porters and waiters.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Morocco?

The weather is good in Morocco! You can expect an average of between 25°C and 30°C when our motorcycle tours take place, but it can cool down in the evening and at altitude. Consider packing some warm clothes just in case. 

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
France

Obtaining a visa for France

European Union residents do not need a visa to visit France. Remember to have your passport or identity card on you during the trip. Until 31 December 2021, all British citizens can travel to France without restrictions but this may change after Brexit. Please be sure to check the UK government’s travel advice website for up-to-date information.

Which driving permit do I need for France?

Don’t forget to take your motorcycle licence, it’s essential.

Practical advice for France

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to France for up-to-date travel information and recommendations.

Health tips for France

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of basic first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please do take any necessary precautions.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to France?

You will need some spending money, mainly for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-300 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

You can withdraw cash or pay by card almost anywhere in France.

Tipping and group kitty

How much to tip in France? When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in France?

The weather is generally good when our tours take place in France, but the evenings can be chilly and you may encounter a short downpour. Consider packing some warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case. 

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

I know where I'm going
Sardinia

Obtaining a visa for Sardinia

You can set off for Sardinia with peace of mind: no visa is needed for European Union nationals. You can travel with your passport or with a valid identity card.

Which driving permit do I need for Sardinia?

You do not need an international driving permit (IDP) to ride a motorcycle in Sardinia, but do not forget to take your motorcycle licence, it is essential.

Practical advice for Sardinia

When travelling to Italy you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

The Italian electricity network operates on 220-230 volts, so you may need to pack an adapter.

European travellers can now use mobile phones at their national rate in all 28 European Union countries without fear of a hefty bill, but check with your operator anyway! Wi-Fi is available at most accommodation providers.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Italy for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Sardinia

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first-aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please do take any necessary precautions.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Sardinia?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-400 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

ATMs are very common; you can withdraw cash almost anywhere in Sardinia.

Tipping and group kitty

How much to tip in Sardinia? When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person.

Service charges are included at most restaurants, otherwise diners usually tip about 10% of the bill. As in the UK, it is common to leave change in cafés or bars. As in most European countries, hotel porters, concierges and staff expect a few euros to thank them for their efficiency!

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Sardinia?

In Sardinia, the weather is good when our tours take place (average 20°C-30°C during the day) with very little chance of rain. It can cool down in the evening and you may even encounter a summer storm, so remember to pack some warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

During the motorcycle tour
Once at the airport, who takes care of me?

When you arrive at the airport, look out for your name on a small Vintage Rides sign. No matter your arrival time, a member of our team will be at the airport to welcome you and take you to your hotel. We will be with you for the duration of the tour until you are back at the airport for your return flight. For certain tour types, such as the off-road course in France, transfers are not included. Check your Full Itinerary as it includes all the tour details.

During the motorcycle tour
What languages does my Tour Leader speak?

Your Tour Leader can speak English and French, and in some cases, the local language.

During the motorcycle tour
Who accompanies the motorcycle tours?

Our Tour Leaders are always experienced motorcyclists, who are passionate about travel and Royal Enfields. Your adventure is in good hands! Tour Leaders ensure communication, serve as a link between you and the rest of the team (mechanic, driver) and encourage connecting with the local people thanks to their great social skills.

The support vehicle follows you around the clock, so you can ride light, not needing to carry luggage or mechanical parts. The support vehicle is also very useful if a pillion wants to rest or if a pilot can no longer ride.

Your Full Itinerary will state if a Tour Leader will accompany your tour.

During the motorcycle tour
Who takes care of me if something goes wrong?

With Vintage Rides, you will never be left stranded in the middle of nowhere with a motorcycle that won’t start. Our team is in permanent contact with your Tour Leader and with our local relays. Whether it’s for a change of itinerary, unforeseeable weather warnings or a hospital stay, you can count on our team if you run into a problem!

During the motorcycle tour
I want to take gifts, what should I pack?

Depending on where you’re going, locals sometimes appreciate receiving small gifts. In general, we prefer to advise you to get in touch with reliable local associations that do an excellent job in our destination countries. If you do want to take gifts, we recommend craft materials (notebooks, colouring books, pens, pencils, markers, stickers, etc. ) for children.

Polaroids are also a great way to connect with the local people!

During the motorcycle tour
What type of food should I expect? Is the water drinkable?

The choice and variety of food will depend on the country and regions you are going to visit.

We generally advise basic hygiene when travelling to avoid getting sick: wash your hands before each meal, avoid drinking tap water (do not contemplate drinking tap water in countries where it is not drinkable).

We recommend that you take your own water bottle and fill it up with filtered water at the accommodation in the morning to avoid plastic waste.

Our travel philosophy encourages trying food and we love introducing our riders to the local cuisine!

We very often eat local food for lunch: we have many trusted restaurants or street stalls. In the evening, there is normally a more varied choice, except in very remote areas.

Be sure to pack basic medicines in case of an upset stomach and just generally watch what you eat.

During the motorcycle tour
I have specific dietary requirements (allergies, vegetarian, gluten-free, etc.). Will I be able to easily eat on tour?

If you have specific dietary requirements (vegetarian, vegan) or intolerances (food allergies, gluten intolerance, etc.) please do let us know. Please do bear in mind that we do have lunch and dinner out most days (hotels, restaurants, street stalls) and it is difficult – sometimes impossible – to check with all the kitchens regarding the ingredients they use to prepare their dishes.

During the motorcycle tour
Are there any Covid-19 measures in place?

In light of the current health crisis, to guarantee your health and safety throughout your tour, we have put in place additional hygiene measures by equipping our support vehicles with hand gel and a few spare masks, as these items are not always readily available on some legs of the tours.

We strongly advise you to pack several face masks and your own hand gel. We generally abide by the health and safety policy of the destination country.

Coming back
Satisfaction questionnaire

At the end of your journey, you will receive a link with a satisfaction questionnaire. We would be really grateful if you could spare a few minutes to give us your feedback: please tell us what you loved and any recommendations for improvement. It really means a lot to us and we take everything on board.

Coming back
What if I have any questions after my trip?

You can contact your travel advisor or send your questions through the satisfaction questionnaire.

Coming back
Where can I share my memories?

We are extremely grateful to all the riders who, over the years, have shared their Vintage Rides tour photos and videos with us! You can of course post them on your social media and tag us so the rest of the VR community can enjoy them too! We would love to use your photos or content on our social media: if you want to share something with us, send it to us and let us know that the content is free from copyright restrictions.

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
What riding level do I need to book on a Vintage Rides tour?

Any motorcycle rider holding a valid motorcycle licence is welcome on our tours. We offer a range of motorcycle tours, suitable for different riding levels and paces. You don’t need to be an experienced rider or seasoned traveller to enjoy a Vintage Rides motorcycle tour. Depending on your experience and what you are looking for in a motorcycle tour, we will find a tour for you.

However, a minimum level of experience is required for some tours, therefore, we will ask you to complete a questionnaire to assess your level. We do need to make sure that all riders in the group have more or less the same level of experience so as to avoid anyone feeling frustrated!

For those riders who have little off-road experience but are longing to hit the tracks in faraway lands, we do offer 1 or 3-day off-road training courses on Royal Enfields in France. Expect multi-terrain environments: the grounds have dirt tracks, gravel, steep climbs and rapid descents. These training courses are the perfect chance to overcome your fear of off-road riding. You could do it solo or with your partner. It’s suitable for complete novices or even those who “know” what they’re doing but have never properly “learnt” all the techniques to play around with the clutch, master the use of the throttle or even adopt a better position when taking a bend. The aim of this training day is to get you ready to set off on an adventure further afie. Thanks to our vast travel experience, we are able to prepare you for the tracks of Asia, Africa and South America.

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
What tour types does Vintage Rides offer?

We offer a range of tours, some mainly cover tracks and others cross smoother, tarmac roads. 

Our Motorcycle Rambles are the perfect balance of the two and allow bikers and their pillions to experience sublime roads without having to be off-roader pros.

Our Luxury Tours offer higher end accommodation to ensure some R ‘n’R after a day of riding.

Riders can go it solo on our Freedom Tour or with some assistance with Explorer Tour packages. 

To define the tour’s riding level or type, we assess their difficulty (road types), pace (number of average riding hours per day, tour length, break days) and the accommodation type (from basic to luxury).

When creating our tours, we do everything in our power to ensure a balanced pace. Our travel advisors will help you pick a tour that is suited to your riding level by asking you about your riding habits and what you want from the tour. Then, all you have to do is choose!

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
How can I prepare for an adventure tour?

Do you want to push yourself to the limits and experience the magic of an adventure tour, but have very little off-road experience? We have created 1- or 3-day off-road Royal Enfield Himalayan training courses in France. Expect multi-terrain environments as the grounds have dirt tracks, gravel, steep climbs and rapid descents. These training sessions are the perfect chance to overcome your fear of off-road riding. You could do it solo or with your partner. It’s suitable for complete novices or even those “who know” what they’re doing but who have never properly “learnt” all the techniques to play around with the clutch, master the use of the throttle or even adopt a better position when taking a bend. The aim is to get you ready to set off on an adventure further afield. Thanks to our vast travel experience, we are able to prepare you for the tracks of Asia, Africa and South America.

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
What motorcycles do we ride on Vintage Rides tours?

Besides being a classic motorcycle with an unforgettable purr, the Royal Enfield rides well on any type of surface, is manoeuvrable, light, and perfect for our tracks and secret roads. With around 60 vehicles, we take great care of our Royal Enfield fleet. Check your Full Itinerary to find out which Royal Enfield model you will be riding on tour. We offer tours on Classic or Standard 500 cc or 350 cc models (350 cc in Sri Lanka by law) and the Himalayan 411 cc. There’s something for everyone!

Take the Royal Enfield Himalayan, for example, an efficient, versatile motorcycle that’s easy to tame! Its 411 cc single-cylinder engine produces a torque of 32 Nm and a maximum power of 24.5 bhp. Its 21-inch wheels make it perfect for getting to grips with off-roading. It really is the best motorcycle for riders who want to experience simplicity and adventure without having to scrimp on comfort. 

The Royal Enfield Bullet and Classic are motorcycles that are full of history with vintage mechanics and style. From the first few miles, you will be won over by the very essence and philosophy of these legendary motorcycles, which are the epitome of travel. The 350 cc or 500 cc single-cylinder models are super efficient no matter the playground. They are easy to ride, thanks to their low centre of gravity with a 135 mm ground clearance and 800 mm saddle height and the smoothness of the articulated rocker arm engine mean that riders get used to them quickly. They have a go-anywhere rideability and never go unnoticed thanks to their unique purr; you’re sure to turn heads along the way!

So, are you ready to set off on an adventure?

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
Who looks after motorcycle maintenance?

A motorcycle expert and logistics pro works closely with our trusted partners to manage our fleet of motorcycles. We ensure the quality of our vehicles all over the world and conduct regular audits. We have more than 10 years of experience in the field and are surrounded by the very best. Our motorcycles are serviced between each tour.

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
I have specific riding needs. Can Vintage Rides cater to them?

All pillions are fitted with comfortable saddles.

If you have specific needs, such as a lowered saddle, please let us know when you book. We will do our best to adapt the motorcycle to your needs.

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
Does Vintage Rides offer motorcycle rental?

We do not rent motorcycles by the day. Our Explorer and Freedom packages do however allow you to set off on a solo adventure, with a GPS, a roadbook prepared by us and hotel reservations (Explorer packages also include assistance from a support vehicle, which carries your luggage).

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
Can I use my own motorcycle?

Leave your motorcycle in the garage! The whole Vintage Rides adventure is about riding this legendary Indian motorcycle. Thanks to its authenticity, charm and classic character, it will not be long before you’re addicted to the Royal Enfield.

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
What equipment do I need for my trip?

No matter where your tour takes place, you will need the usual motorcycle equipment and maybe a few extras. Choose equipment that will ensure your safety: protective gloves, a jacket with back and elbow protection, waterproof ankle boots, and above all, a good quality helmet. Do not forget a scarf, neck tube or a mask to keep the dust out of your face, a decent pair of sunglasses and sun cream. Also remember to pack rain gear just in case.

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
Do I need to pack a helmet?

Yes! You should never ride without a helmet, no matter where you are in the world.

However, helmets are not always allowed on board in carry-on baggage, so make sure you check with your airline before departure.

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels
Can I buy motorcycle equipment when I get to the destination?

Even if it were indeed possible, we strongly recommend against buying your motorcycle equipment at the motorcycle tour destination. Your best bet is to take equipment that you are used to and that has adapted to your body type. There is nothing worse than starting a motorcycle tour with shoes that hurt your feet, a tight helmet or uncomfortable gloves. What’s more, you may not find equipment that is to CE standards and we cannot guarantee the reliability of local standards.

You wish to know more?

TRAVELLING WITH VINTAGE RIDES

Who are Vintage Rides?

Stemming from a passion for adventure travel and Royal Enfield motorcycles, Vintage Rides designs and runs classic motorcycle tours that combine the pleasure of riding a motorbike, discovering off-the-beaten-track destinations and seeking adventure.

You wish to know more?

Why travel with Vintage Rides?

Vintage Rides is the pioneer of Royal Enfield motorcycle tours. We launched this concept in 2006 and our team of travel and biking enthusiasts strive to continually improve our motorcycle tours. Our team consists of tour leaders, mechanics, travel advisors and coordinators and we are all passionate about adventure, authentic experiences and tracks that lead us into the unknown. It is this passion combined with our constant thirst for new adventures that guarantee you an extraordinary experience when you book a Vintage Rides tour..

Vintage Rides is registered on the Atout France register (French Tourism Development Agency) with certificate No. IM075150006 issued on 01/09/2015.

In accordance with Article L.211-18 of the French Tourism Code, Vintage Rides has financial security from the French Tour Operator Association (APST by its acronym in French) and Professional Civil Liability insurance from HISCOX Europe Underwriting Limited, and fulfils the professional aptitude conditions required by this article to operate in France.

When you choose to travel with Vintage Rides, you are embarking on an adventure with a French agency regulated by the French Tourism Code that has sound financial and insurance guarantees.

You wish to know more?

How can I contact Vintage Rides?

Our agency is based in Lyon, France. You can contact our team by telephone on +44 (0)20 7031 6050 from Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. or by appointment in Lyon.

You wish to know more?

Booking a motorcycle tour

Do I need a motorcycle licence?

There is only one rule if you want to go on a Vintage Rides motorcycle tour as a pilot: you need to hold an A or A2 licence. We will advise you on the best tour type in line with your riding level.

Most of our tours are suitable for pillions. However, we do not recommend and sometimes even do not allow pillions on some tours due to their difficulty. Contact your motorcycle travel advisor to discuss the type of trip you have in mind.

You wish to know more?

Do I need to pay a deposit / motorcycle insurance?

A deposit is required from pilots. The deposit amount is stated in the Full Itinerary and depends on the tour destination.

The deposit is secured via our partner Swikly, but not debited from your account. A Vintage Rides representative will carry out an inventory of your motorcycle with you before and after your motorcycle tour. The deposit may be retained if the motorcycle is damaged in any way or to cover the insurance excess in the event of an accident. Your travel documents will include a list of prices for repairs and spare parts for each destination.

You wish to know more?

How far in advance should I book a motorcycle tour?

We recommend booking your tour at least six months in advance so that you can guarantee your preferred dates. This also gives you plenty of time to obtain visas and the international driving permit (IDP) for the countries where they are required. We recommend applying for your international driving permit as soon as you start planning your motorcycle tour to avoid any delays. In the UK, you can obtain your IDP at the Post Office. For riders from other countries, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations. 

You can consult the I know where I’m going section to find out more about the country you are travelling to. Feel free to talk to your travel advisor who will advise you on each destination.

You wish to know more?

What if I have to cancel my trip?

Had an unexpected turn of events? Broken your collarbone, been invited to a last-minute family party or had your motorcycle licence suspended? Do you need to cancel your Vintage Rides motorcycle tour?

You can find out about our cancellation policy in our Terms and Conditions. Also, please do not hesitate to contact us and we will do our best to find a solution together.

You wish to know more?

Are there any age or fitness restrictions?

There is no age limit for a Vintage Rides motorcycle tour. We accept all bikers – from total novices to veterans – depending on the tour, as long as you are in good physical shape and able to keep up with the pace.

However, one point to keep in mind: no motorcycle tour is a walk in the park, even the less challenging ones. Many of our off-the-beaten-track motorcycle tours take place in countries where the health system is not on par with that of your home country. We therefore recommend being extra careful: you need to be fully transparent about the state of your health and tell us about your medical history or treatments. If you are not sure if you should join a tour due to your age or physical condition, do not hesitate to contact your travel advisor to talk about it and consult your doctor. Our recommendations can in no way replace sound medical advice.

You wish to know more?

Does Vintage Rides book international flights?

We currently do not offer international flight booking services. Some applications like Skyscanner can help you find the right flight. If you have any queries about dates or times, our team is here to help you find the best flight for your tour.

You wish to know more?

What is included in the tour price?

Your Full Itinerary outlines what is and is not included in the tour price.

Remember three important things: international flights, visas and travel insurance (with repatriation, medical and legal assistance cover) are always your responsibility.

You wish to know more?

How do I book on a motorcycle tour?

You can contact Vintage Rides either by leaving your contact details via the contact form and a tour advisor will get back to you or you can call +44 (0)20 7031 6050 or email at hello@vintagerides.com.

Booking procedure:
1. Read and e-Sign the quote and Terms & Conditions (you’ll receive them via email).
2. Pay your deposit (50% of the tour price).
3. You will receive a payment link via email.


PLEASE NOTE: your motorcycle tour is only considered booked when we receive your signed quote and Terms & Conditions and you have paid the deposit.
Your tour must be paid in full 45 days before the departure date. You will automatically receive a reminder email.

How to prepare for your tour:
This is very important! When you book far enough in advance (at least three months before the departure date) you will receive four emails to help you prepare for your tour. It is really important that you follow the instructions included in them.

1st email: immediately after booking
2nd email: 90 days before departure
3rd email: 60 days before departure
4th email: 15 days before departure

You wish to know more?

Preparing for a motorcycle tour

What type of luggage should I take?

What does an adventurer’s bag look like? If you want to travel light, plan on packing two or three daytime outfits depending on the tour length. On some tours, especially those where you spend two nights at the same place, you will be able to get your laundry washed. Pack evening wear for dinners (a shirt or polo shirt, one pair of shorts or trousers). A pair of flip-flops is always practical and a warm top (jumper or jacket) because it can even get chilly in the middle of the desert. That way you’ll have plenty of room for motorcycle gear, waterproofs and gifts without going over 15 kg.

 

As for your luggage, depending on your tour type, you may have to carry it or the support vehicle will. Either way, you will pack it, unpack it, carry it about, etc., so it is a good idea to opt for something that is easy to carry, resistant and waterproof. There will be very few occasions where you get the chance to wheel a suitcase, except maybe at the airport, so a backpack or duffle bag are probably the best options. Try not to go over 15 kg, especially if your tour includes a domestic flight, as you could find yourself paying for excess baggage. If needed, you can always wash essentials at your accommodation and even get laundry done in some cases. Just think about the positives: the fewer items you pack, the more room you have for souvenirs and gifts.

 

On most tours, riders’ luggage is transported by a support vehicle (check your Full Itinerary for your case), so we recommend packing a small backpack to keep all your daytime essentials with you on the motorcycle, i.e. camera, sun cream, waterproofs, water bottle or anything else you may need to keep at hand.

You wish to know more?

Personal belongings and valuables

You are responsible for your own personal belongings and we always prefer to encourage you to take extra caution. During your trip, you will change accommodation almost every day, eat somewhere new for every meal, meet new people, visit many different places, so there are many occasions where you could lose or forget your personal belongings! Avoid carrying high-value items (jewellery, video or photo equipment, tablets or large sums of cash) at all costs and never leave them unattended, not even in the support vehicle!

You wish to know more?

What should I pack?

The Full Itinerary includes a list of motorcycle and personal equipment, as well as recommended clothing depending on your destination’s climate and riding conditions.

There are some basics that would come in handy on any tour, not to mention good-quality motorcycle gear: waterproof walking boots/shoes, comfortable clothing with breathable materials, a good pair of sunglasses and a small backpack to carry your daytime essentials. Try not to go over 15 kg, especially if your tour includes a domestic flight: you could find yourself paying for excess baggage. You will always be able to wash essentials at the hotel, and even get laundry done at some accommodation providers.

You wish to know more?

Should I pack a first aid kit and basic medicines?

It is always a good idea to pack a few basic medicines and first aid items. Sun cream, a moisturising chapstick, paracetamol, anti-diarrhoeal medicines, disinfectant, dressings and plasters are essential in case of any minor injuries or mishaps.

This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the health systems in the destination country/ies do not always equal those in your home country. We therefore advise you to visit your GP before departure and he/she can help you customise your travel first aid kit.

Don’t forget to pack your prescriptions!

You wish to know more?

Can I do my laundry on the tour?

You may be able to wash your laundry when you spend two nights at the same place or if you arrive early at the end of your day’s riding. You should check with the accommodation providers and your Tour Leader once you are there.

You wish to know more?

Do I need to take out travel insurance?

Yes, you should never travel without insurance! You need to take out travel insurance that covers medical costs abroad, repatriation assistance, accidents involving two-wheeled vehicles (large displacement) and legal assistance.

Many insurance companies offer complete, effective packages (€60-€80 per person) and some credit cards also have special offers (i.e. if you purchase your flight with the same card). You must make sure that the insurance covers motorised travel in the destination countries and the special riding conditions.

For European motorcycle tours, until 31 December 2020, all British citizens can receive medical assistance with the EHIC card.

You wish to know more?

Do I need to obtain an international driving permit?

You may need an international driving permit (IDP) to drive in some non-EU countries. You can get an IDP at the Post Office. Please check if you need an IDP on the British government’s travel advice page. If you are from another country, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

If you already have an IDP, check that it is still valid before you travel. IDPs are valid for one to three years, depending on the type of IDP required and your destination country. For more information per country, check the I know where I am going section.

You wish to know more?

Can I extend my trip?

If you have booked to spend longer at the destination, you can extend your trip. You can spend an extra night at the start or end of the trip or choose from our extension catalogue for each destination! We know all of the countries inside out and are always here to share our tips with you.

You wish to know more?

What room types are there on the motorcycle tours?

You can choose your room type: double room (one double bed), twin (two single beds) or single room (i.e. you are alone in the room, in a single or double bed). We always do our best to accommodate your requests. If you are travelling alone, you will by default share a twin room with another rider. However, you can request a single room from your travel advisor in advance at an additional cost and subject to availability.

You wish to know more?

What accommodation types are available?

Depending on the destination and the tour you’ve chosen, you will stay at authentic guesthouses, comfortable hotels, with host families, in yurts or even at palaces like something out of Arabian Nights. We explore the destinations to discover and offer you the most original accommodation. In more remote areas, accommodation is sometimes rustic or even really basic: that’s sometimes part and parcel of having an extraordinary experience!

Your Full Itinerary describes the accommodation types and provides a general overview with photos. The accommodation mentioned in the Full Itinerary is an indication only and subject to availability.

You wish to know more?

Do I need to pack towels and bed linen?

You do not need to pack your own towels because hotels generally provide them, especially on our Motorcycle Rambles and Luxury Tours of course. However, it is always useful to pack a small, lightweight, compact microfibre towel, especially on Adventure Tours!

Some Full Itineraries recommend packing a sleeping bag and/or sleeping bag liners. On some tours, the accommodation conditions are somewhat rudimentary and the temperatures can drop quickly: it is therefore safer to pack extra. If it is not mentioned in the Full Itinerary, you do not need to pack it, unless you prefer to travel that way!

You wish to know more?

What is the electricity supply like on tour?

You can consult the I know where I’m going section to learn more about the types of travel adapters you’d need to charge your devices and the stability of the electricity supply at the destinations.

You wish to know more?

Is there mobile phone and Wi-Fi coverage on tour?

More and more hotels offer free Wi-Fi connection and traditional mobile operators work in most regions. But those who love being connected must be aware that the Wi-Fi signal can be very hit-and-miss and in some remote areas there may not even be an Internet connection. Some of our Mongolian and Himalayan tours could be the perfect occasion to take a digital detox! Take a look at the I know where I’m going section to learn more.

You wish to know more?

I know where I'm going

Bhutan

Obtaining a visa for India and Bhutan

Our local partner takes care of obtaining your visa for Bhutan. You don’t have to do anything.

However, your trip begins in India, so you must obtain a visa for India. You can apply for the Indian e-visa online via the Indian Visa website, meaning that you do not have to travel anywhere or provide your original documents.

It could take longer to obtain your visa during peak season: we therefore recommend that you apply for the “1 year” e-visa once you have booked your flights and of course, if the departure is in less than 365 days.

Please note, the application process is quite complex and we will not be able to intervene with the Indian authorities if you choose the incorrect e-visa. If you do not feel comfortable using computers, you may be better off seeking visa application services. You must use your name exactly as it appears on your passport (e.g. “Joe E. Bloggs”) for your Indian e-visa application and the e-visa may be requested at boarding and upon arrival.

Which driving permit do I need for Bhutan?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Bhutan. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Only the international driving permit is recognised in Bhutan and must be presented with your UK or European driving licence, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Bhutan

While travelling in Bhutan, you are subject to Bhutanese laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. are subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

In hotel rooms, sockets are designed to accept European and American plugs, you should therefore pack an adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The mobile phone network is generally good, except in some remote areas.

Wi-Fi addicts be warned: Wi-Fi is available in most hotels, but not everywhere, especially on the most remote legs of the tour.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Bhutan for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check your government’s travel recommendations for Bhutan.

Health tips for Bhutan

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of recommended first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Bhutan is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Bhutan?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-400 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

ATMs are more and more common; you can withdraw cash in the main cities in Bhutan (Paro, Thimphu). Your bank card may even be accepted in some places. However, we do recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at the bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Bhutan, tipping is a common practice and an integral part of Bhutanese culture. A tip is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. Here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. You should tip hotel porters 20-50 Indian rupees or Bhutanese ngultrum depending on the amount of luggage they carry for you. You should leave about 10% of the bill in restaurants that do not include service charge.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Bhutan?

It is generally cold in Bhutan (average 7°C-10°C during the day) with little chance of showers. It can get very cold in the evening, so remember to pack warm clothes. Always pack a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

India

Obtaining a visa for India

You can obtain the Indian e-visa online via the Indian Visa website, meaning that you do not have to travel anywhere or provide your original documents.

It could take longer to obtain your visa during peak season: we therefore recommend that you apply for the “1 year” e-visa once you have booked your flights and if the departure is in less than 365 days, of course.

Please note, the application process is quite complex and we will not be able to intervene with the Indian authorities if you choose the incorrect e-visa. If you do not feel comfortable using computers, you may be better off seeking visa application services. You must use your name exactly as it appears on your passport (e.g. “Joe E. Bloggs”) for your Indian e-visa application and the e-visa may be requested at boarding and upon arrival.

Which driving permit do I need for India?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in India. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Only the international driving permit is recognised in India and must be presented with your UK or European driving licence, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for India

While travelling in India, you are subject to Indian laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. are subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Plugs with two round pins are generally found in India, you should therefore pack an adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The telephone network in India is generally good except in the Himalayas, especially the Ladakh region. Apart from in the capital, Leh, calls don’t always go through and satellite phones are prohibited because it is a military area on the border with China.

Electricity and hot water are available in most areas, but not always guaranteed, especially in more remote regions. Generators are used to compensate for the bad electricity supply during blackouts, but they are often turned on sporadically and sometimes turned off at night.

Wi-Fi is available at most hotels in Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and southern India. Wi-Fi is not so readily available in Ladakh and the Himalayas, so if you really can’t live without, we recommend buying a SIM card when you arrive at the airport.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to India for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check your government’s travel recommendations for India.

Health tips for India

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of recommended first aid items and medicines. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in India is hit-and-miss and almost non-existent in more remote areas.

The UK government’s foreign travel advice website and the World Health Organization website provide recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

Acute altitude sickness can be the bane of our travels in the Himalayas, especially Ladakh. Our tours are designed for riders to acclimatise to the high-altitude environment and gradually climb, spending a limited time at high altitude (the time it takes to ride across the passes). Our team and your Tour Leader are experienced at spotting altitude sickness symptoms (headaches, nausea, loss of appetite, insomnia, etc.) and their consequences and will do everything possible to make sure you acclimatise. Some recommendations: drink lots of water, eat garlic, chew coca leaves, limit your alcohol intake and avoid straining yourself physically. If necessary, the support vehicle carries oxygen cylinders. Ask your doctor for advice on high altitude travel and get suitable medication prescribed if you need to.

Important: for Kinnaur and Ladakh tours, we need a medical certificate stating that you are in good health for riding at high altitudes.

How much spending money should I take to India? 

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your tour, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

Cash machines are more and more common; you can withdraw cash almost everywhere in India except in the Himalayas. It is therefore a good idea to withdraw money in Delhi, Dharamsala or Leh, as the later legs are very remote. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In India, tipping is a common practice and an integral part of Indian culture. A tip is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. You should tip hotel porters 20-50 rupees depending on the amount of luggage they carry for you. You should tip about 10% of the bill in restaurants that do not include service charge.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of group members and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in India?

The climate in India is varied. The country is so vast and its diverse landscapes mean temperature differences: expect an alpine climate in Ladakh, humidity in the Himalayan foothills, dry or humid tropics in southern India and a semi-arid to desert climate in Rajasthan!

You can generally expect little rain except in the Himalayan foothills, and rather pleasant or even hot temperatures, except in the Himalayas. We always recommend packing a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

Nepal

Obtaining a visa for Nepal

You can obtain an “On Arrival” visa upon arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport (Kathmandu). The procedure is quick and simple but there may be queues during peak season.

Which driving permit do I need for Nepal?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Nepal. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Only the international driving permit is recognised in Nepal and must be presented with your UK or European driving licence, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Nepal

While travelling in Nepal, you are subject to Nepalese laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. are subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Plugs with two round pins are generally found in Nepal, you should therefore pack an adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The telephone network coverage is generally good, except in Mustang.

Electricity and hot water are available in most areas, but not always guaranteed, especially in more remote regions of Mustang. Generators are used to compensate for the bad electricity supply during blackouts, but they are often turned on sporadically and sometimes turned off at night.

Wi-Fi is available at most hotels, except in Mustang. If you really can’t live without the Internet, we recommend buying a SIM card when you arrive at the airport. 

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Nepal for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check your government’s travel recommendations for Nepal.

Health tips for Nepal

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of recommended first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Nepal is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

Acute altitude sickness can be the bane of our travels in the Himalayas, especially Mustang. Our tours are designed for riders to acclimatise to the high-altitude environment and gradually climb, spending a limited time at high altitude (the time it takes to ride across the passes). Our team and your Tour Leader are experienced at spotting altitude sickness symptoms (headaches, nausea, loss of appetite, insomnia, etc.) and their consequences and will do everything possible to make sure you acclimatise. Some recommendations: drink lots of water, eat garlic, chew coca leaves, limit alcohol and avoid straining yourself physically. If necessary, the support vehicle carries oxygen cylinders. Ask your doctor for advice on high altitude travel and get suitable medication prescribed if you need to.

Important: for motorcycle tours in Nepal, we need a medical certificate stating that you are in good health for riding at high altitudes.

How much spending money should I take to Nepal? 

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-400 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

Cash machines are more and more common; you can withdraw money almost everywhere in Nepal, except in Mustang. It is therefore a good idea to withdraw money in Kathmandu or Pokhara, as the later legs are very remote. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Nepal, tipping is a common practice and an integral part of Nepalese culture. A tip is a gesture of thanks for a service rendered. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. You should tip hotel porters 40-100 Nepalese rupees depending on the amount of luggage they carry for you. You should tip about 10% of the bill in restaurants that do not include service charge.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Nepal?

During the seasons when we organise our trips to Nepal, the weather is generally good and the temperatures are pleasant in the daytime. It can be cold in the evening or even bitter in Mustang and Upper Mustang, where the weather is unpredictable. Warm clothes are a must! You can generally expect little rain, but pack a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case. 

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

Sri Lanka

Obtaining a visa for Sri Lanka

An Electronic Travel Authorisation (ETA) visa is required to travel to Sri Lanka. You can request it online via the Sri Lankan government’s website and you do not have to travel anywhere or provide your original documents.

Which driving permit do I need for Sri Lanka?

In Sri Lanka, you will need an International Driving Permit (IDP) and a Sri Lankan recognition permit to drive in Sri Lanka. 

Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located. We will then need your international driving permit as soon as possible to create your Sri Lankan recognition permit before departure. We take care of the procedures for obtaining the Sri Lankan permit.

Practical advice for Sri Lanka

While travelling to Sri Lanka you are subject to Sri Lankan laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

In hotel rooms, sockets are designed to accept European and American plugs, you should therefore pack an adapter or buy one when you arrive.

Wi-Fi addicts be warned: Wi-Fi is available in most hotels, but not everywhere, especially on the most remote legs of the tour.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Sri Lanka for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check your government’s travel recommendations for Sri Lanka.

Health tips for Sri Lanka

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of recommended first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Sri Lanka is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Sri Lanka?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

ATMs are very common; you can withdraw cash almost anywhere in Sri Lanka. However, we do recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Sri Lanka, tipping is a common practice and an integral part of Sri Lankan culture. A tip is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. You should tip hotel porters 50-100 Sri Lankan rupees depending on the amount of luggage they carry for you. You should leave about 10% of the bill in restaurants.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Sri Lanka?

It is generally hot in Sri Lanka during the seasons when we organise tours (average 30°C during the day) with some chance of showers. The climate can be cooler and the weather more uncertain in the Knuckles Mountain region. So remember to pack some warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

Thailand and Laos

Obtaining a visa for Thailand and Laos

You can set off for Thailand with peace of mind: British passport holders arriving by air or land can enter for 30 days without a visa! However, we do recommend you check your particular case.

Visa conditions change regularly in Laos. For the most up-to-date information, contact the nearest Laos Embassy or Consulate.

Please note: Laos offers an e-VISA. Unfortunately, we cross the border at Friendship Bridge number 4 (IV) where this e-VISA is not valid.

Which driving permit do I need for Thailand and Laos?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in both Thailand and Laos. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in these two countries and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Thailand and Laos

While travelling in Thailand and Laos, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Standard voltage in Thailand is 220 V and plugs have two flat parallel pins, you should therefore pack a travel adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The telephone network is generally good and Wi-Fi is available at most accommodation providers, but not everywhere, especially on the more remote legs.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Thailand and Laos for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Thailand and Laos

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Thailand or Laos is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Thailand and Laos?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

ATMs are very common; you can withdraw cash almost anywhere in Thailand and Laos. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Thailand and Laos, tipping is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Thailand and Laos?

It is generally warm in Thailand and Laos during the seasons when we travel there (average 30°C during the day) with little chance of rain. However, it can be cooler and more uncertain in mountainous regions, so remember to pack some warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

Indonesia

Obtaining a visa for Indonesia

You can set off for Indonesia with peace of mind: British citizen passport holders don’t need a visa for visits of up to 30 days! However, you should check the embassy website if your case is different.

Which driving permit do I need for Indonesia?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Indonesia. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in Indonesia and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Indonesia

While travelling in Indonesia you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Standard voltage is 220 ;, you should therefore pack a travel adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The mobile phone network is generally good and Wi-Fi is available at most hotels.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Indonesia for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Indonesia

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Indonesia is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Indonesia?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €400-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks). 

ATMs are very common; you can withdraw cash almost anywhere in Indonesia. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Indonesia, tipping is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Indonesia?

It is generally warm in Indonesia when we organise our tours (average 30°C during the day) with little chance of rain. It can be cooler and the weather more uncertain in mountainous regions. It is a good idea to pack warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

Mongolia

Obtaining a visa for Mongolia

A visa is required to travel to Mongolia. We will send you an invitation letter to attach to your visa application, approximately 3 weeks before departure.

You can also request it yourself from the Mongolia Immigration Agency or that of your country of origin.

Which driving permit do I need for Mongolia?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Mongolia. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in Mongolia and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Mongolia

While travelling in Mongolia, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

For your trip to Mongolia, you are recommended to pack an adapter: the sockets are three-pronged (alternating current 220 V, 50 Hz).

The mobile phone network covers the capital and the main cities. Beyond that, coverage is hit-and-miss. Wi-Fi is available in cities, but you can’t rely on it in remote areas.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Mongolia for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Mongolia

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Mongolia is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

Important: for Mongolia, we need a medical certificate stating that you are in good health for riding at high altitudes.

How much spending money should I take to Mongolia?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €300-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

ATMs are very common; you can withdraw cash in the main stopover towns. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in a city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

In Mongolia, tipping is a gesture of thanks for a service. You are free to choose whether to tip and set the amount, depending on how satisfied you are with the service you have received. Who should you tip? In general, you should tip anyone who has provided a service to the group: your Tour Leader, the mechanic and the driver, waiters at restaurants or street stalls, porters, etc.

When travelling it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. Here are our recommendations for the team: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Mongolia?

You can expect an average between 15°C and 25°C during our tours with little chance of rain. It can cool down in the evening and in some areas. For the Frozen Ride tour, it can be very, very cold! Pack warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

Peru

Obtaining a visa for Peru

You can set off for Peru with peace of mind: you do not need a visa to stay for less than 3 months! However, do check the UK government’s travel advice website for up-to-date information or with your own government if you are not British.

Which driving permit do I need for Peru?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Peru. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in Peru and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Peru

When travelling to Peru, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

For your trip to Peru, we recommend packing an adapter just in case because some sockets only take plugs with two flat prongs (110/220 V, 50/60 Hz).

The mobile phone network is generally good and Wi-Fi is available at most hotels, but not everywhere, especially on the more remote legs.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Peru for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Peru

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Peru is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

Important: for Peru, we need a medical certificate stating that you are in good health for riding at high altitudes.

How much spending money should I take to Peru?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €400-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

You will find cash machines in Arequipa and at popular tourist sites at the very least. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. Service charges are included at most restaurants, otherwise diners usually leave 10% of the bill. You should tip hotel porters 3-5 soles depending on the amount of luggage they carry for you. 

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Peru?

You can expect an average between 15°C and 25°C when our motorcycle tours take place with little chance of rain. It can cool down in the evening and at altitude, so remember to pack warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

Rwanda

Obtaining a visa for Rwanda

A visa is required to enter Rwanda. According to the UK government’s travel advice, 30-day tourist visas are free and available on arrival for citizens of country members of the African Union, La Francophonie or the Commonwealth, including the UK. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Which driving permit do I need for Rwanda?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in Rwanda. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in Rwanda and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. We will need the copy of the first page to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for Rwanda

While travelling in Rwanda, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Rwanda operates on a 230 V supply voltage and 50 Hz, i.e. the same as in Europe. You should therefore pack a European travel adapter or buy one on arrival.

The mobile phone network is generally good and Wi-Fi is available at most hotels, but not everywhere, especially on the more remote legs of the tour.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Rwanda for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Rwanda

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Rwanda is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Rwanda?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €400-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

You will find ATM machines on most legs of the tour and at popular tourist sites at the very least. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. Here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. Service charges are included at most restaurants, otherwise diners usually leave 10% of the bill. You should tip hotel porters, concierges and staff a few US dollars to show your gratitude. 

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Rwanda?

The temperatures are rather pleasant and vary little during the year. You can expect an average of 30°C during the day and 15°C at night. Remember to pack some warm clothes for cool evenings.

You wish to know more?

South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini

Obtaining a visa for South Africa

You can set off for South Africa with peace of mind: British passport holders do not require a visa to visit South Africa. For Lesotho and Eswatini, we take care of border crossing formalities. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Which driving permit do I need for South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini?

The international driving permit (IDP) is compulsory in South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini. Please check the British government’s travel advice website and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

We would like to remind you that only the international driving permit is recognised in South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini and must be presented with your UK or European driving licences, so remember to take both. If you have an older, paper UK driving licence, you must take another form of photographic ID, such as your passport. We will need the copy of the first page of your licence to verify validity, but also the inside page where the stamps are located.

Practical advice for South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini

When traveling to South Africa, Lesotho or Eswatini, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

A travel adapter would be required while travelling in South Africa, if you wish to use any UK electrical appliances (220-230 V). Universal adapters can be bought at supermarkets or at the airport.

The mobile phone network is excellent, as is the Wi-Fi, which is available at most hotels.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in some of the more remote areas is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site for South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €400-500 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

You will find ATMs almost everywhere. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the town/city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. Here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. Service charges are included at most restaurants, otherwise diners usually leave 10% of the bill. In hotels, you can leave a tip in the room for the housekeeper (around R10-15 per night) or give it to her directly. It is common to tip hotel porters 10 rand per bag. People have a habit of leaving a 10% tip for taxi drivers too.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in South Africa, Lesotho and Eswatini?

You can expect an average of between 10°C and 25°C when our motorcycle tours take place with little chance of rain. It can cool down in the evening and at altitude, so remember to pack warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

Morocco

Obtaining a visa for Morocco

You can set off for Morocco with peace of mind: according to the UK government’s travel advice website, British nationals don’t need a visa to enter Morocco for the purpose of tourism for up to three months. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Which driving permit do I need for Morocco?

Please check the UK government’s travel advice website for driving abroad and apply for an IDP at the Post Office. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Practical advice for Morocco

When traveling to Morocco, you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

Morocco operates on 220 V supply voltage with European standard plugs, you should therefore pack a travel adapter or buy one when you arrive.

The mobile phone network is generally good, as is the Wi-Fi, except in remote regions.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Morocco for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Morocco

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please be aware that the quality of healthcare in Morocco is not the same as in your home country.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Morocco?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-300 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

You will find cash machines on most legs of the tour. However, we recommend that you take some cash with you to exchange at a bureau de change at the airport or in the city centre. That way you avoid hefty banking fees and will not have any unpleasant surprises if the ATMs are down.

Tipping and group kitty

Tipping is not compulsory in Morocco but is very common. When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. Here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person. It is custom to tip a few dirhams to anyone who carries your bags or does you some sort of favour. A good tip in a restaurant is around 10- 15% of the bill. It is common to give 10% for taxis and 5-10 dirhams to porters and waiters.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Morocco?

The weather is good in Morocco! You can expect an average of between 25°C and 30°C when our motorcycle tours take place, but it can cool down in the evening and at altitude. Consider packing some warm clothes just in case. 

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

France

Obtaining a visa for France

European Union residents do not need a visa to visit France. Remember to have your passport or identity card on you during the trip. Until 31 December 2021, all British citizens can travel to France without restrictions but this may change after Brexit. Please be sure to check the UK government’s travel advice website for up-to-date information.

Which driving permit do I need for France?

Don’t forget to take your motorcycle licence, it’s essential.

Practical advice for France

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to France for up-to-date travel information and recommendations.

Health tips for France

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of basic first aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please do take any necessary precautions.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to France?

You will need some spending money, mainly for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-300 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

You can withdraw cash or pay by card almost anywhere in France.

Tipping and group kitty

How much to tip in France? When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person.

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in France?

The weather is generally good when our tours take place in France, but the evenings can be chilly and you may encounter a short downpour. Consider packing some warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing just in case. 

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

Sardinia

Obtaining a visa for Sardinia

You can set off for Sardinia with peace of mind: no visa is needed for European Union nationals. You can travel with your passport or with a valid identity card.

Which driving permit do I need for Sardinia?

You do not need an international driving permit (IDP) to ride a motorcycle in Sardinia, but do not forget to take your motorcycle licence, it is essential.

Practical advice for Sardinia

When travelling to Italy you are subject to local laws and their restrictions. Certain objects such as satellite phones, drones, etc. may be subject to regulation and you may be fined for being in possession of them. Make sure you find out more before packing.

The Italian electricity network operates on 220-230 volts, so you may need to pack an adapter.

European travellers can now use mobile phones at their national rate in all 28 European Union countries without fear of a hefty bill, but check with your operator anyway! Wi-Fi is available at most accommodation providers.

We advise you to visit the UK government’s website on travelling to Italy for up-to-date travel information and recommendations. If you are not British, please be sure to check with your government’s recommendations.

Health tips for Sardinia

Consult the Preparing for your motorcycle tour section for a list of first-aid items and medicines you should pack. This list of basics does not in any way replace professional material and may not be suitable for your medical condition. If you do have a medical condition, please do take any necessary precautions.

Visit the UK government’s foreign travel advice site and the World Health Organization website for recommendations and a list of mandatory vaccines.

How much spending money should I take to Sardinia?

We will take care of you from the start to the end of your trip, however, you will need some spending money, mainly for extra meals when you are on half board. Don’t forget you will need to pay for drinks, souvenirs, personal expenses, admissions to monuments or museums and tips. Depending on the length of the tour, you may want to take €200-400 in spending money, but it really depends on how much you like to spend on holiday (i.e. shopping and drinks).

ATMs are very common; you can withdraw cash almost anywhere in Sardinia.

Tipping and group kitty

How much to tip in Sardinia? When travelling, it is difficult to know how much to tip in line with the local standard of living. According to the recommendations on whototip.net, here are our suggestions: you should tip your Tour Leader €3-5 per day/person and the mechanic and driver €2-3 per day/person.

Service charges are included at most restaurants, otherwise diners usually tip about 10% of the bill. As in the UK, it is common to leave change in cafés or bars. As in most European countries, hotel porters, concierges and staff expect a few euros to thank them for their efficiency!

So that you don’t have to collect money for tips every day, the Tour Leader usually suggests creating a kitty at the start of the trip (€15-€20 per person) depending on the number of members in the group and the tour length. One of the group members can be in charge of the kitty with help from the Tour Leader, who can tell him/her where, when, and how much to tip.

What’s the weather like in Sardinia?

In Sardinia, the weather is good when our tours take place (average 20°C-30°C during the day) with very little chance of rain. It can cool down in the evening and you may even encounter a summer storm, so remember to pack some warm clothes, a rain suit or waterproof clothing.

Do not hesitate to consult general travel advice sites for bikers or your Full Itinerary to find out what equipment and clothes you should pack.

You wish to know more?

During the motorcycle tour

Once at the airport, who takes care of me?

When you arrive at the airport, look out for your name on a small Vintage Rides sign. No matter your arrival time, a member of our team will be at the airport to welcome you and take you to your hotel. We will be with you for the duration of the tour until you are back at the airport for your return flight. For certain tour types, such as the off-road course in France, transfers are not included. Check your Full Itinerary as it includes all the tour details.

You wish to know more?

What languages does my Tour Leader speak?

Your Tour Leader can speak English and French, and in some cases, the local language.

You wish to know more?

Who accompanies the motorcycle tours?

Our Tour Leaders are always experienced motorcyclists, who are passionate about travel and Royal Enfields. Your adventure is in good hands! Tour Leaders ensure communication, serve as a link between you and the rest of the team (mechanic, driver) and encourage connecting with the local people thanks to their great social skills.

The support vehicle follows you around the clock, so you can ride light, not needing to carry luggage or mechanical parts. The support vehicle is also very useful if a pillion wants to rest or if a pilot can no longer ride.

Your Full Itinerary will state if a Tour Leader will accompany your tour.

You wish to know more?

Who takes care of me if something goes wrong?

With Vintage Rides, you will never be left stranded in the middle of nowhere with a motorcycle that won’t start. Our team is in permanent contact with your Tour Leader and with our local relays. Whether it’s for a change of itinerary, unforeseeable weather warnings or a hospital stay, you can count on our team if you run into a problem!

You wish to know more?

I want to take gifts, what should I pack?

Depending on where you’re going, locals sometimes appreciate receiving small gifts. In general, we prefer to advise you to get in touch with reliable local associations that do an excellent job in our destination countries. If you do want to take gifts, we recommend craft materials (notebooks, colouring books, pens, pencils, markers, stickers, etc. ) for children.

Polaroids are also a great way to connect with the local people!

You wish to know more?

What type of food should I expect? Is the water drinkable?

The choice and variety of food will depend on the country and regions you are going to visit.

We generally advise basic hygiene when travelling to avoid getting sick: wash your hands before each meal, avoid drinking tap water (do not contemplate drinking tap water in countries where it is not drinkable).

We recommend that you take your own water bottle and fill it up with filtered water at the accommodation in the morning to avoid plastic waste.

Our travel philosophy encourages trying food and we love introducing our riders to the local cuisine!

We very often eat local food for lunch: we have many trusted restaurants or street stalls. In the evening, there is normally a more varied choice, except in very remote areas.

Be sure to pack basic medicines in case of an upset stomach and just generally watch what you eat.

You wish to know more?

I have specific dietary requirements (allergies, vegetarian, gluten-free, etc.). Will I be able to easily eat on tour?

If you have specific dietary requirements (vegetarian, vegan) or intolerances (food allergies, gluten intolerance, etc.) please do let us know. Please do bear in mind that we do have lunch and dinner out most days (hotels, restaurants, street stalls) and it is difficult – sometimes impossible – to check with all the kitchens regarding the ingredients they use to prepare their dishes.

You wish to know more?

Are there any Covid-19 measures in place?

In light of the current health crisis, to guarantee your health and safety throughout your tour, we have put in place additional hygiene measures by equipping our support vehicles with hand gel and a few spare masks, as these items are not always readily available on some legs of the tours.

We strongly advise you to pack several face masks and your own hand gel. We generally abide by the health and safety policy of the destination country.

You wish to know more?

Coming back

Satisfaction questionnaire

At the end of your journey, you will receive a link with a satisfaction questionnaire. We would be really grateful if you could spare a few minutes to give us your feedback: please tell us what you loved and any recommendations for improvement. It really means a lot to us and we take everything on board.

You wish to know more?

What if I have any questions after my trip?

You can contact your travel advisor or send your questions through the satisfaction questionnaire.

You wish to know more?

Where can I share my memories?

We are extremely grateful to all the riders who, over the years, have shared their Vintage Rides tour photos and videos with us! You can of course post them on your social media and tag us so the rest of the VR community can enjoy them too! We would love to use your photos or content on our social media: if you want to share something with us, send it to us and let us know that the content is free from copyright restrictions.

You wish to know more?

Motorcycles, equipment and riding levels

What riding level do I need to book on a Vintage Rides tour?

Any motorcycle rider holding a valid motorcycle licence is welcome on our tours. We offer a range of motorcycle tours, suitable for different riding levels and paces. You don’t need to be an experienced rider or seasoned traveller to enjoy a Vintage Rides motorcycle tour. Depending on your experience and what you are looking for in a motorcycle tour, we will find a tour for you.

However, a minimum level of experience is required for some tours, therefore, we will ask you to complete a questionnaire to assess your level. We do need to make sure that all riders in the group have more or less the same level of experience so as to avoid anyone feeling frustrated!

For those riders who have little off-road experience but are longing to hit the tracks in faraway lands, we do offer 1 or 3-day off-road training courses on Royal Enfields in France. Expect multi-terrain environments: the grounds have dirt tracks, gravel, steep climbs and rapid descents. These training courses are the perfect chance to overcome your fear of off-road riding. You could do it solo or with your partner. It’s suitable for complete novices or even those who “know” what they’re doing but have never properly “learnt” all the techniques to play around with the clutch, master the use of the throttle or even adopt a better position when taking a bend. The aim of this training day is to get you ready to set off on an adventure further afie. Thanks to our vast travel experience, we are able to prepare you for the tracks of Asia, Africa and South America.

You wish to know more?

What tour types does Vintage Rides offer?

We offer a range of tours, some mainly cover tracks and others cross smoother, tarmac roads. 

Our Motorcycle Rambles are the perfect balance of the two and allow bikers and their pillions to experience sublime roads without having to be off-roader pros.

Our Luxury Tours offer higher end accommodation to ensure some R ‘n’R after a day of riding.

Riders can go it solo on our Freedom Tour or with some assistance with Explorer Tour packages. 

To define the tour’s riding level or type, we assess their difficulty (road types), pace (number of average riding hours per day, tour length, break days) and the accommodation type (from basic to luxury).

When creating our tours, we do everything in our power to ensure a balanced pace. Our travel advisors will help you pick a tour that is suited to your riding level by asking you about your riding habits and what you want from the tour. Then, all you have to do is choose!

You wish to know more?

How can I prepare for an adventure tour?

Do you want to push yourself to the limits and experience the magic of an adventure tour, but have very little off-road experience? We have created 1- or 3-day off-road Royal Enfield Himalayan training courses in France. Expect multi-terrain environments as the grounds have dirt tracks, gravel, steep climbs and rapid descents. These training sessions are the perfect chance to overcome your fear of off-road riding. You could do it solo or with your partner. It’s suitable for complete novices or even those “who know” what they’re doing but who have never properly “learnt” all the techniques to play around with the clutch, master the use of the throttle or even adopt a better position when taking a bend. The aim is to get you ready to set off on an adventure further afield. Thanks to our vast travel experience, we are able to prepare you for the tracks of Asia, Africa and South America.

You wish to know more?

What motorcycles do we ride on Vintage Rides tours?

Besides being a classic motorcycle with an unforgettable purr, the Royal Enfield rides well on any type of surface, is manoeuvrable, light, and perfect for our tracks and secret roads. With around 60 vehicles, we take great care of our Royal Enfield fleet. Check your Full Itinerary to find out which Royal Enfield model you will be riding on tour. We offer tours on Classic or Standard 500 cc or 350 cc models (350 cc in Sri Lanka by law) and the Himalayan 411 cc. There’s something for everyone!

Take the Royal Enfield Himalayan, for example, an efficient, versatile motorcycle that’s easy to tame! Its 411 cc single-cylinder engine produces a torque of 32 Nm and a maximum power of 24.5 bhp. Its 21-inch wheels make it perfect for getting to grips with off-roading. It really is the best motorcycle for riders who want to experience simplicity and adventure without having to scrimp on comfort. 

The Royal Enfield Bullet and Classic are motorcycles that are full of history with vintage mechanics and style. From the first few miles, you will be won over by the very essence and philosophy of these legendary motorcycles, which are the epitome of travel. The 350 cc or 500 cc single-cylinder models are super efficient no matter the playground. They are easy to ride, thanks to their low centre of gravity with a 135 mm ground clearance and 800 mm saddle height and the smoothness of the articulated rocker arm engine mean that riders get used to them quickly. They have a go-anywhere rideability and never go unnoticed thanks to their unique purr; you’re sure to turn heads along the way!

So, are you ready to set off on an adventure?

You wish to know more?

Who looks after motorcycle maintenance?

A motorcycle expert and logistics pro works closely with our trusted partners to manage our fleet of motorcycles. We ensure the quality of our vehicles all over the world and conduct regular audits. We have more than 10 years of experience in the field and are surrounded by the very best. Our motorcycles are serviced between each tour.

You wish to know more?

I have specific riding needs. Can Vintage Rides cater to them?

All pillions are fitted with comfortable saddles.

If you have specific needs, such as a lowered saddle, please let us know when you book. We will do our best to adapt the motorcycle to your needs.

You wish to know more?

Does Vintage Rides offer motorcycle rental?

We do not rent motorcycles by the day. Our Explorer and Freedom packages do however allow you to set off on a solo adventure, with a GPS, a roadbook prepared by us and hotel reservations (Explorer packages also include assistance from a support vehicle, which carries your luggage).

You wish to know more?

Can I use my own motorcycle?

Leave your motorcycle in the garage! The whole Vintage Rides adventure is about riding this legendary Indian motorcycle. Thanks to its authenticity, charm and classic character, it will not be long before you’re addicted to the Royal Enfield.

You wish to know more?

What equipment do I need for my trip?

No matter where your tour takes place, you will need the usual motorcycle equipment and maybe a few extras. Choose equipment that will ensure your safety: protective gloves, a jacket with back and elbow protection, waterproof ankle boots, and above all, a good quality helmet. Do not forget a scarf, neck tube or a mask to keep the dust out of your face, a decent pair of sunglasses and sun cream. Also remember to pack rain gear just in case.

You wish to know more?

Do I need to pack a helmet?

Yes! You should never ride without a helmet, no matter where you are in the world.

However, helmets are not always allowed on board in carry-on baggage, so make sure you check with your airline before departure.

You wish to know more?

Can I buy motorcycle equipment when I get to the destination?

Even if it were indeed possible, we strongly recommend against buying your motorcycle equipment at the motorcycle tour destination. Your best bet is to take equipment that you are used to and that has adapted to your body type. There is nothing worse than starting a motorcycle tour with shoes that hurt your feet, a tight helmet or uncomfortable gloves. What’s more, you may not find equipment that is to CE standards and we cannot guarantee the reliability of local standards.

You wish to know more?
Florian
Contact Florian
your motorcycle tour expert


Send us
a message
Want to be called back?
Describe your project
Let's talk
right now
Chat
Live chat
Phone
Phone
Get news and new-tour info straight to your mailbox
×
Subscribe to the newsletter
Thank You

You will now be kept up to date with the news at Vintage Rides.

Thank you Go further with Vintage Rides!
Discover
our latest video

Merci pour votre message.
NOTRE ÉQUIPE VA ÉTABLIR VOTRE CARTE CADEAU ET PRENDRA CONTACT AVEC VOUS POUR PROCÉDER AU RÈGLEMENT NOUS RESTONS À VOTRE DISPOSITION POUR TOUTES QUESTIONS AU 04 87 91 31 96
Download the

Please fill the fields below

Want to be called back?
You wish to leave us a message?
Ask for information

Please fill the fields below

Want to be called back?
You wish to leave us a message?
Leave my contact details

Please fill the fields below

You wish to leave us a message?
Want to be called back?
Suggest a date

Please fill the fields below

Want to be called back?
Suggest your dates
Download the

Download